Metal Detector Coins – What to Expect

Metal detector coins are really no different than other coins, except that at some point in the past, they were lost. As the technology of detectors has improved, so have these devices become more available. Many a coin collector has emerged from an afternoon of searching a beach, an old playground, or even a backyard.

So what kind of coins can I expect to find with a metal detector?

Depending on where you look, you could find virtually any type of coin that has ever been made. Remember that everyone has lost a bit of pocket change along the way, and most of us have found some as well.

What kind of coins do you want to find?

What would be more exciting to find – a modern dime or quarter made by the bazillions from a tough copper-nickel alloy, or a solid silver coin made when your great grandfather was a small boy?

Think about it… coins are made to circulate among people who earn and spend them. Coins have been spent for almost anything, and anywhere. With a bit of thought, you can imagine where larger groups of people would have congregated, what attracted them to that place, and what they would have spent their money on.

Was there an amusement park located near your town in years gone by? When the circus came to town, where did it put up its tents? Is there a lake with a beach that people have gone to for years? What about schools, playgrounds, areas with older homes? (Be very sure you get permission to do your search. Metal detecting is not a license to trespass.)

Learning the history of your own community, speaking with older relatives and friends – mining their memories – can provide the clues you need to get started.

What kind of coins can be found with a metal detector?

Again, almost any kind of coin that has ever been made. Modern detectors are designed to discriminate between different metals. And it is possible to filter the feedback from the device to emphasize or exclude coins of one composition or another.

Can I find valuable coins?

Most of what you will find will be common rather than rare. After all, most of the coins in circulation now, as in the past, are common within their historical context.

But don’t forget, prior to 1965 dimes, quarters, and halves were made of 90 percent silver. And prior to 1933 gold coins were in use.

Won’t they be kind of messed up from being in the ground, or underwater?

Sure.

They’ll be heavily tarnished and dirty for the most part. You’ll be tempted to clean them, but don’t. Collectors pay much less for coins that have been cleaned. They like them undisturbed. And since you may well be on the way to becoming a coin collector yourself, you will want to keep your coins as original as possible.

Two final thoughts on coins found while metal detecting. First, these coins are acquired at no cost, other than what you’ve spent on your detector. (Don’t count the value of your time – this is fun, not work!) Second, you are receiving each coin, not from a coin dealer or an auction, but from the hand of the person who lost it. That connects you with people and events of another time in a way rather different from reading a history book.

The Best Way to Begin Coin Collecting

The best way to begin coin collecting is by learning all you can about it. Whatever it was that got you interested has done you a favor. Coin collecting is a hobby that can grab you by the tail and never let go. But that is a good thing. Building a coin collection can be a bit like accumulating bookmarks while surfing the Internet. One great find leads to another!

Ask a coin collector how he got started in the hobby and you will likely be told about —
receiving coins from an older relative, or —
rediscovering the pocket change from a recent foreign vacation, or —
finding old coins in a forgotten dresser drawer, or —
hearing a news story about a fabulous price paid for a rare coin at auction, or —
locating a barely definable old coin with a metal detector in the backyard, or —
seeing a close-up shot of a stack of twenty dollar gold pieces on a high stakes poker table in a Western movie, or —
reading about the recovery of a centuries old cargo of silver coins from a Spanish treasure galleon, or —
finding an odd coin on the sidewalk, under the bed, or lodged deep within the spicy confines of a macho-combo burrito. (It could happen.)

Whatever the circumstances, I challenge you to find a serious coin collector who cannot recall why and how he got hooked on building a collection of meaningful coins.

Meaningful coins?

The ones worth big bucks, right?

Sure. If you are into coins strictly for their market value, then yes, high value coins are where you want to be. (But be sure and learn how to grade coins and gain some knowledge about what makes one coin worth more than another.)

On the other hand, many collectors are just as passionate about their coins for other reasons, not quantifiable in the coin market. Coins are so often tokens of curiosity about people, places, and historical events.

Every coin has a story. Every coin collection is as well a collection of these stories. Take your cue from these stories as a direction for your collecting.

The longer you collect, the more you will learn. The more you learn the more meaningful will be your collection. And it will lead you down some fascinating paths.

When an old family friend gave me a tattered old bill from his wallet, it expanded my interest in coins to include paper money. My friend had carried this note for years as a familiar oddity — a conversation piece perhaps. Only recently I have discovered that this old Confederate dollar bill was, in fact, a counterfeit. But, of course, there was more to the story. That is on my website at [http://www.valuable-coin-stories.com/old-paper-money.html]

About The Author:

David W. Baker has collected coins since age 11 — so, more than half a century. Coins have been a pleasant distraction for him over the years. Though he’s never been a coin dealer, he has have occasionally sold a coin or two at a nice profit, when the market was right. These experiences taught him a bit about coin value in the marketplace. But, he would be the first to say that his greatest pleasure with coins has been the hooks they have to history and other areas of learning. Dave says that he can never quite get beyond the feeling that, if any of his coins could talk, the stories would be priceless!

App Fog Genius Lessons From A Successful Entrepreneur

App Fog Business Startup Lessons from a Lucrative Entrepreneur

Lucas Carlson is a successful startup entrepreneur. When he first started however, he made a few bad choices that almost cost him big time.

Don’t Skip Business Setup Planning

At first he was just programming an idea for App Fog. He didn’t have a landing page, any bank account, brain storming ideas, or thinking about the ideal customers. Skipping key steps really put him back for years. He would program for weeks, and then finish the app idea. Then program for weeks and finish the idea. He couldn’t get people interested in the idea that was created.

Creating a Landing Page

Finally, he decided to create a landing page one night when he was too tired to sleep or even tell his wife about the programming idea. The app idea was PHP Fog. He tried putting it up on a site before that called Heroku.com. He registered the PHP Fog website and just simply wrote “it’s like Heroku for PHP”. Heroku’s site only allowed for Rudy on Rails applications so he couldn’t put the applications on that site.

Living the Dream

The next morning he woke up and had eight hundred people on his website! He didn’t market it anywhere else. All he did was put one link on Hacker News network. Also, he described the website in more depth. It turned out that the idea was a “hair on fire” idea without even the creation of the project! This gave him assurance that if the effort is put in, the results will be desired. After programming for two weeks. he just only had a prototype and the traffic went from 800 to 4,000 unique visitors per day!

Hair on Fire Problem Equals Confidence

He had identified a “hair on fire” problem. This gave him confidence to program the solution. This changed his life forever! He realized the difference between having a problem that people know they have versus the problems that people don’t know they have. PHP Fog wound up being AppFog. It raised $10 billion dollars and was later bought out.

No Marketing Expenses

He didn’t spend a dime on marketing! It wasn’t an accident. People already wanted the idea and were looking for it. He learned that he could find what people already wanted and then program an application based on what they wanted. He wasn’t taking a “shot in the dark” anymore.

Don’t be Intimidated

Creating a landing page or micro-website is very scary for most people. They don’t want to know if others like their great idea or not. There is a denial psychological part to this way of thinking. It can be self-defeating to the creation of an idea. They will think “Well I believe in the idea so much, that I don’t care what other people think about it”. This philosophy will kill a great idea. Put your “right foot first” and see what people need.